Boys victims dating violence

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Males are more likely to report they use violence to intimidate, cause fear, or force their girlfriends into doing something. Results of teen dating violence and sexual assault include serious physical harm, emotional damage, sexually transmitted disease, unwanted pregnancy, and death.One in three high school students have been or will be involved in an abusive relationship. Some victims provoke the violence committed by their dates by making them jealous, acting mean, or teasing them into thinking they want to have sex.40% of teenage girls ages 14 to 17 say they know someone their age who has been hit or beaten by a boyfriend and women ages 16-24 experience the highest rate per capita of intimate violence. FACT: Teen dating violence and sexual assault is estimated to occur between lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth at about the same rate as in straight teen relationships.However, LGBTQ youth are even less likely than heterosexual youth to tell anyone or seek help, and there are fewer resources for these teens.According to the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, approximately 10 percent of adolescents nationwide reported being the victim of physical violence at the hands of a romantic partner during the previous year.[1] The rate of psychological victimization is even higher: Between two and three in 10 reported being verbally or psychologically abused in the previous year, according to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.[2] As for perpetration rates, there are currently no nationwide estimates for who does the abusing, and state estimates vary significantly.In South Carolina, for example, nearly 8 percent of adolescents reported being physically violent to a romantic partner.

Teen dating violence has serious consequences for victims and their schools.

A 2001 study of high school students conducted by Harvard University found that 1 in 5 teenage girls had been physically or sexually abused by a dating partner FACT: Research shows that teen girls are not as likely to be as abusive as teen boys.

Teen boys are far more likely to initiate violence and teen girls are more likely to be violent in a case of self-defense. Bureau of Justice statistics reports that over 90% of the reported incidents of assaults in FACT: Teen dating violence can be very dangerous – sometimes lethal.

However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.

Teen dating violence [PDF 187KB] is defined as the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional violence within a dating relationship, including stalking. Teen dating violence (physical and sexual) among US high school students: Findings from the 2013 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. As teens develop emotionally, they are heavily influenced by experiences in their relationships.

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